The independent student newspaper of the University of New Hampshire since 1911

The New Hampshire

Our state, our vote, our home

Allison Bellucci, Executive Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






As seen on A1, 40 recent proposals to adjust many of New Hampshire’s voting laws have been submitted, one of which puts out-of-state students’ voting rights at risk. The predominantly Republican house members have submitted a bill to change the definition of a domicile. This definition would be used to decide if a person can legally vote in the state. Other proposals introduced would rid same-day voter registration, yet another bill that many students relied on this past election.

Coming to UNH my freshman year, I had a hard time leaving home. I never expected Durham to feel like home, nor to feel such pride for the state of New Hampshire. Now, as a second semester senior, I have completely turned around, always referring to Durham as my home, and finding myself feeling more like a New Hampshire-ite every year. And this year, I felt more a part of the New Hampshire community than ever before when I was able to participate in conversation and vote for the future leaders in the state government. I care about New Hampshire policy, about issues regarding education, the environment and other topics surrounding the future of the state’s well-being.

The New Hampshire workforce is aging, and the majority of students from UNH aren’t staying in the state. Want to know how to get even less out-of-state students to stay and work here? Don’t have them invested in state issues and take away their ability to make a choice for a place they call home. If we truly want UNH graduates working in New Hampshire, making them feel included and invested in the community is key to keeping these young, educated people in the state.

If these Republicans want to truly uphold a “country first” philosophy, limiting civic engagement at a young age by making it more difficult to vote is very irresponsible. Giving students the ability to vote in state and providing easy access to polls and voting registration is the way to do it. This year, Durham had a record high voting turn out with 9,633 votes cast and 3,121 same day registrations, according to the unofficial general election results for Durham on Nov. 8, 2016. I can say with confidence that many students, especially students who registered the day of the election, would not have filled out an absentee ballot. This new proposal would undoubtedly bar many educated young-adults from their rightful American civil duty.

It’s no surprise, however, that this proposal is in place. Statewide, Clinton won 48 percent to Trump’s 47 percent, while in Durham, Clinton led with 68 percent of votes to Trump’s 26 percent. According to Seacoast Online and NHPR, this domicile dispute stems from a general heightened GOP concern regarding voter fraud, even though state officials say they have no evidence that voter fraud is a widespread problem in New Hampshire. Then again, it wouldn’t be the first time the Republican party has been shaken up by us “liberal snowflake” millennials. Let the blizzards begin. 

Allison Bellucci

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share:
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someonePrint this pageShare on LinkedIn

8 Comments

8 Responses to “Our state, our vote, our home”

  1. Terry Miller on February 28th, 2017 8:58 am

    A responsible student such as yourself who values the right to vote will not be denied that right by any of the proposals under consideration. But voting is a right, not a privilege or entitlement. And a law that requires us to adhere to a reasonable 30-day residence requirement, or that prevents people from voting in two states, or that otherwise discourages the manipulation of first-time out-of-State voters at left- or right-leaning college campuses, is not itself unreasonable. I live and vote in Durham. The mass bussing of UNH students (some in vehicles marked with political slogans and some with MA plates) and the long long lines of students at the first-time-voter table was a clearly organized effort to manipulate the vote in our town. If laws can be tightened to reduce this kind of abuse, I for one welcome the debate.

    [Reply]

    Griffin Kelley Reply:

    Terry, I understand your point of view and share your passion for the right of voting. However, I have a problem with you saying that the student transportation was “clearly” an effort to “manipulate” the town’s vote.

    Neithert the buses’ state of registration nor or the political slogans printed on their sides have any bearing on who is inside and how they voted. It was a “Get Out the Vote” effort and it served its purpose. By “manipulate the vote” I think you mean, encourage and allow people to speak their minds and perform their civic duty. There’s absolutely no evidence of an effort to manipulate the vote. That story is hogwash. Unless you can provide evidence otherwise, I think you should be supportive of all people having their voices heard. Additionally, what good does “manipulating” Durham, NH, do in the larger picture? There seems to be a false sense of importance of singular cities there that is confirmed by the bus conspiracy.

    Wonderful piece, Allison. Thank you for speaking out against oppression.

    [Reply]

  2. C. Falbe on February 28th, 2017 8:50 pm

    Student’s right to vote are not in jeopardy. They can acquire an absentee ballot in their primary place of residence and vote. Saying your college dorm feels like home is not justification to vote in an area they partially live in. I welcome and encourage voting of everyone who actually make NH their permanent residence.

    I became convinced we need to eliminate walk in voting and need for ID when I voted in the 2012 election and observed a young girl come in to vote with no ID (she said her wallet was stolen). She also could produce no utility or other bills indicating her residence. She could not name her landlord when questioned, AND she was allowed to vote. When I challenged the worker allowing that, I was told it was the NH way. Something very wrong when we open voting to what could be fraud. Please tell me why in most of my everyday living, I have to provide identification even to buy groceries and NH under values a legitimate voting process.

    To the argument that requiring ID to vote causes the loss of people staying to work is ludicrous and a red herring. Job opportunities or the lack of is the major reason people leave this state.

    [Reply]

  3. Mike the Deplorable on March 1st, 2017 6:41 am

    Dear Allison, I just have a few questions if you don’t mind..

    What state did you come to UNH from?
    Do you go back for the summer?
    Do you have a state issued ID from there? (driver’s license or otherwise)
    Are you eligible to vote there?
    Does the state you came from revoke your residency and eligibility to vote there while you’re a student at UNH?
    Did you vote via absentee ballot there? (be honest)
    Do your parents still claim you as a dependent on their tax return there?
    Have you acquired any type of state issued ID here? (your UNH ID doesn’t count)

    Waiting with bated breath..

    [Reply]

  4. Mike the Deplorable on March 1st, 2017 6:51 am

    Oh yeah, one more question..

    Do you have health insurance through your parent’s insurance policy in their state?

    [Reply]

  5. J. Brown on March 1st, 2017 9:23 am

    Nowhere in the proposed legislation is there any mention of preventing your vote. You neglect to state where you come from, and I will take the liberty to suppose it is not from a town or city in NH. With a little effort on your part – if voting is important to you – you could obtain an absentee ballot to vote in your home district. I am a legal resident in NH, I am not a resident of Durham. My son, whose legal residence was here, at home, while he was a student at UNH, easily got an absentee ballot and voted. That was the right thing to do. If you truly wish to vote in NH, LIVE here, not just go to school here. Get a residence, a NH drivers’ license, (hopefully) a job, and begin to love this state as a wonderful place to live your life, not a political entity to be manipulated. I appreciate your feelings, but something so important to the health and well-being of our great country cannot be left to people’s feelings, and as such, I agree with the poster above vis a vis voter fraud. I am happy you feel Durham is your new home. Do you plan on staying here, accepting the results of your vote and how it will affect us long-time residents, or will you leave NH after your schooling and go elsewhere (home?), leaving us to deal with the end result of your and your fellow out-of-staters’ actions? I hope you stay.

    [Reply]

  6. Frank Saglio on March 14th, 2017 10:28 pm

    I love hearing “did your parents claim you as a dependent on their tax return”. I would love for one of you scholars to show me what bearing the Internal Revenue Code’s definition of dependent has to do with domicile for voting purposes.

    [Reply]

  7. John Roberts on March 17th, 2017 5:07 am

    Someone who thinks that the NYT’s is a reputable newspaper isnt qualified to lecture to the people of NH. Go back to CT, we have enough of your kind here in NH ruining it!

    [Reply]

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Our state, our vote, our home

    Showcase

    TNH’s annual Wildcat Sports Awards

  • Our state, our vote, our home

    Features

    Vietnam War veteran shares experiences in preparation for MUB display

  • Our state, our vote, our home

    News

    Trump supporter speaks out about campus experiences

  • Our state, our vote, our home

    News

    SHARPP promotes assault awareness in discussion

  • Our state, our vote, our home

    News

    Senate rejects SAFC chair nomination

  • Our state, our vote, our home

    News

    Display debacle: political orgs feud after MUB poster removal

  • Our state, our vote, our home

    Showcase

    The finishing touch: After slow start to season, UNH punches ticket to conference tournament

  • Our state, our vote, our home

    Columns

    Three sides to the story

  • Our state, our vote, our home

    News

    Relay for Life raises $92,000 during annual event

  • Our state, our vote, our home

    News

    counseling conundrum: staff resignations revealed

The independent student newspaper of the University of New Hampshire since 1911
Our state, our vote, our home