Syllabus week is now behind us, and whether or not we feel prepared, this academic year is not going to decelerate for anyone. In the coming weeks, summer will turn into fall, sororities and fraternities will begin their rush weeks, football season will be in full swing and students will do their absolute best to get involved while staying on top of grades. As a campus that is constantly buzzing with countless events, it’s important to feel a sense of safety and security. With UNH Alert, an alert system managed by the UNH Police Department by way of alerts sent to registered cell phones or email accounts, the students and faculty members who embody this large and engaging campus have an advantage right at their fingertips.  

As members of the student body, one of our most important responsibilities is to look out for one another. Unfortunately, unsettling things do sometimes occur on our campus. Those who were students on campus last year may recall the incident of an altercation involving a knife that occurred during the early hours of Feb. 19. This is one extreme yet important example of when an alert was sent out to the student body, informing them of a man who was suspected of committing an assault with a knife that occurred in Durham. It alerted the student body to be cautious in and near the area of Madbury Commons, where the stabbing had recently been reported.

“Had it not been for the alert warning our campus about the potential danger on Madbury Commons, a student could walk right into a crisis situation,” sophomore nutrition major Aimee Carignan said. “Thanks to UNH Alert, the student body, including myself, knew to be extra cautious when walking around campus that night,” she said.

In addition to alerting the campus about critical emergencies, UNH Alert also sends a text or an email regarding the issue of curtailed operations.

According to Chief Paul Dean of UNH Police, the UNH Alert system undergoes regular testing. Although there have not been any changes made to the system since last year, he noted that “[The UNH Police Department] is always exploring new technology to deliver the campus alerts.”  

There is no reason that members of the UNH community shouldn’t be taking advantage of a program designed to keep them informed. Five minutes of your time could potentially mean the difference between being safe and being at the wrong place at the wrong time. You can sign up for UNH Alerts at alert.unh.edu.  

Executive Editor