Though the knitting art form dates back to thousands of years, the tradition has since migrated to UNH’s campus.
Enter the UNH Knitting Club. Founded in 2011 by former UNH student Mary Foster, the club is a bucolic group of students in solidarity who are crafting the means to deliver the most cherishing garment, to either don on their own body or tribute to a companion.

UNH Knitting club doing what they do best, knitting

UNH Knitting club doing what they do best, knitting


Former Knitting Club Vice-President and graduate of New Hampshire’s collegiate institution Ragnar Kempf was conversing with current Knitting Club President Victoria Lorvig via video chat while the club’s weekly meeting was underway last Friday, Sept. 30.
“This was one of my more impressive projects,” Kempf said while holding a knitted squirrel up to his computer camera from his bedroom in Londonderry, New Hampshire. Kempf spent one hour a week in Knitting Club for two years to complete his squirrel.
The Knitting Club’s participants on Friday embellished the harmonious vibrations that poured from auras of their fellow knitters, creating a meditative atmosphere.
According to Lorvig, it’s a “decompression club.”
Brian Rafferty, who was sitting across from Lorvig, stopped from mending his scarf to agree on the relaxation he gets from the knitting.
Rafferty, a third year scholar from New York with a focus in studying history, found his way to the Knitting Club last spring.
One day, while eating in Holloway Commons (HoCo) with a few of his friends, Rafferty noticed a flyer on the dining table for the Knitting Club. Since then, he has joined and seen his knitting abilities increase.
An intricately knit squirrel courtesy of the UNH knitting club

An intricately knit squirrel courtesy of the UNH knitting club


Besides reaching inner peace and tranquility when knitting, there are also monetary savings that can be beneficial to college students when fabricating their own garb. Simple ragg wool knitted hats from L.L. Bean can cost upwards of $24.95. A ball of wool yarn has a cost as low as $3.99.
Rafferty called his monetary savings “satisfying.”
Within the knitting community, there is a delightful practice called ‘giving.’
“What’s neat about knitting is you can give people gifts and people think they are a precious treasure, when it’s something you could’ve blasted out in a three hour lecture,” Lorvig said.
Though the Knitting Club is open to all of UNH’s community, there have yet to be any professors seen knitting with the club after Friday classes.
A very realistic-looking knit squirrel studying abroad in London

A very realistic-looking knit squirrel studying abroad in London


Lorvig noted that she would be “delighted” if professors came and knitted with students who make up the club.
All members of UNH’s community are invited to join the Knitting Club, which meets every Friday, 4–5 p.m. in room 115 of the Memorial Union Building (MUB).

Executive Editor