By KYLE KITTREDGE
Staff Writer
Along with the end of the semester comes registration for classes, and while some students don’t have to worry, others endlessly dread it based on their RAC times.
RAC times, or Registration Access Codes, are the numbers given to the University of New Hampshire students to enable them to sign up for classes. A designated sign-up time comes with each RAC number as well.
It can sometimes prevent students from getting into courses. It is generally more of a problem for underclassmen since they are not as far into their respective majors yet.
“They are put into each class and generated by an algorithm, so it is totally random,” said Donna Reed, the associate registrar at UNH. “It’s like a lottery. Everyone is in the same boat.”
“It is not based on the number of credits each student has,” Reed added.
Regardless, students experience problems and disappointment from signing up for classes.
Sarah Flannery, a freshman communications major, found it difficult to get into her classes. She also recently declared her major.
“I had a RAC time at 10:30 a.m. I couldn’t get into the intro communications courses, and anthropology, for a Discovery course,” Flannery said. “I chose some alternatives, but I wasn’t really interested in them.”
Krysta Gingue, a political science major, had a similar experience.
“Last semester I didn’t get into a minor class or Gen Eds because the class was full at that time due to my crappy RAC,” said Gingue. “I ended up getting into the class during add-drop but it annoyed me that I had to go through the extra steps when it seemed unnecessary.”
Some students, however, don’t experience any problems when signing up, including Matthew Woodcock, a freshman history major who didn’t have any trouble.
“Nope, I didn’t have any problems,” said Woodcock, “I got all the classes I wanted very easily. I was lucky.”
In different departments of the colleges, some students don’t experience many problems when signing up for classes either.
Brad Kinsey, a professor and chairman in the mechanical engineering department, explained students usually do get their classes in his department.
“It’s not a huge problem for mechanical engineers,” Kinsey said. “Juniors and seniors don’t have a problem. It doesn’t stop them from graduating. There’s no difficulty with sophomores and freshman either. If they can’t sign up for first year, they take them when they can.”
“There is a slight issue with discovery program courses,” Kinsey added. “It’s only a mild trouble. Again, students get them when they can.”
If any students have problems, Reed urges them to see their advisor.
“Talking to advisors helps if you can’t get into courses,” Reed said.
Reed also explained that the Office of the Registrar is sending out a notice at the end of the week about fall semester sign-ups.
“Right now it’s limited to 18 credits, so you’re not able to add a fifth course. But it’s being raised up to being able to add five courses,” Reed said. “The Faculty Senate passed motion to allow for first week of school, instead of using the add-drop form.”
Webcat registration re-opens on July 8 for all undergraduates at 8 a.m.

Executive Editor