With throngs of students either returning to campus or just arriving for the first time comes an influx of cars, mopeds and motorcycles that fill the parking lots of the UNH campus. To meet the increased traffic, parking regulations are set in place to keep the campus as safe as possible, from students walking to classes to vehicles moving through lots, roads and parking areas and spaces.  

With a rise of mopeds on campus, UNH Transportation Services reminds students that non-freshmen campus residents are allowed to bring a motorcycle, moped or a car. However, students cannot purchase a permit for two vehicles.  

UNH Parking Regulations Article V, section 9A states that, “Motorcycle Permits and Moped permits are distinct permits issued to any eligible faculty/staff or commuter student for parking a motorcycle or moped. Commuter student eligibility “proximity” restrictions apply for motorcycle permits, but not for moped permits. Moped permits are limited by availability. Non-freshman campus residents may purchase a motorcycle or moped permit, but will not be entitled to a permit for any other vehicle.”  

Program manager at UNH Transportation Services Marc Laliberte clarifies that this rule is nothing new. 

“The campus infrastructure can only support so much traffic and parking,” he said. “Accordingly, UNH operates under a policy of Transportation Demand Management (TDM) which is intended to stem the proliferation of vehicles that operate on campus, including mopeds. Eligible campus residents are limited to one vehicle. A similar regulation prevents commuters from bringing two vehicles to campus at the same time.” 

Junior political science and Justice Studies dual-major Nicholas Crosby, the student coordinator for UNH Transportation Services, works specifically within the Parking Services division. He posted onto the University of New Hampshire Class of 2020 Facebook page on June 29, urging students to take caution when planning to bring a moped to campus. 

“I felt inclined to post about it online because sooner or later the clarifying rule would be announced, and I didn’t want people to buy a moped, if they were going to buy a Residential permit and found out later that they can’t get a Moped permit,” Crosby said. “So, as a concerned student, I wanted to make sure students understand that they can’t buy both a Residential permit as well as a Moped or Motorcycle permit. Eligible Commuter and Faculty/Staff permits can still buy a Moped or Motorcycle permits, but they can’t have both a moped or motorcycle and a vehicle on campus at the same time.” 

Crosby also warns students of the risks of purchasing permits online.  

“It has always been a rule that permits are non-transferable and can’t be sold/given/used by another person even if the person who holds the permit no longer is at UNH or doesn’t need the permit anymore,” he said. 

The permit purchasing process is available online now through the parking office. Eligible students unable to purchase their desired permit are able to add their name to a waitlist. Resident Lots include E/E1/E2 Lots, Gables Lots, Woodside Lots, Mast Road, Mathes Lot and West Edge.  

The closing of Forest Park Complex has brought the introduction of a pay-per-hour metered parking renamed the “College Road Visitor Lot,” located by Morse Hall, and “E2 Lot,” located by Haaland Hall. The new category, “Resident East,” allows the purchase of parking permits for all non-freshmen campus residents in Lots E, E1 or E2. 

Due to continued construction, students who hold permits for Resident East will be unable to park there for the first month of the fall semester.  

“To compensate, we’re holding off on the roll-out of the College Road Visitor Lot until Lot E2 does re-open, and allowing Resident East permit-holders to park there temporarily,” Laliberte said.  

Though classes officially begin Aug. 26, UNH Transportation is hopeful that by Oct. 1 Lots E, E1 and E2 will be available for students and that College Road Visitor Lot will be open for hourly parking, according to Laliberte.