Last Friday, The University of New Hampshire (UNH) hosted its annual Makers Expo, which gives faculty and students the chance to sell their art.

Around 40 members of the university participated in the event that took place at the Memorial Union Building (MUB) from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

The Granite State Room had four rows of seven tables, each displaying art widely different from the next. Clothing, jewelry, pottery, woodwork, and even bread were amongst some of the products.

Senior civil engineering major Tim Murray was selling the bread he made in the kitchen of his dorm, Peterson Hall.

“I’m known as the bread guy,” Murray joked. He has had his business “Pin & Roller” for around seven months now, and the Maker’s Expo was his first time ever selling his bread; despite carting his bread through Peterson to give out to fellow residents. 

“There’s one stove,” he explained. “It can do four loaves at a time. So, you multiply that by 100 loaves, and that’s roughly how much you get.”

Murry had an array of bread on his table, displaying his creations (which took two days to complete in the tiny dorm kitchen) ranging from sourdough to cinnamon raison, all selling by the loaf, or mini-loaf, for $6-$10.

“It’s made specially by students for students,” Murray said. “Cause a lot of us have meal plans, we don’t have time, but a lot of us can enjoy a fresh loaf of bread.”

Another set of students under the business name, Bottle Kaps, were selling different images (in this case, a map of the United States), using various-colored bottle caps with a bottle opener next to the picture.

Resident Hall Director (RHD) Brittany Cotton showcased her jewelry business she started before going to grad school. She made colorful bracelets and bold earrings, selling them alongside another RHD who was selling knitted scarfs and hats.

For a different creative approach, junior marketing major Nola Hesby sold buttons made by her and her mom and greeting cards painted with her art on them. She also sold 87 of her stickers which featured her designs that varied from puns such as “Market Casket,” “Stoke Palace,” and a New Hampshire collection of state and motto stickers.

Hesby has done art her whole life and has sold her art at the Makers Expo for two years now after finding out about it through Facebook.

“It honestly makes me so happy,” she said about the event.

“It’s kind of a way to showcase a talent that might not be apparent in your major,” Hesby said. “I’m a marketing major, and not that it’s not creative, but I don’t get a chance to sell my own stuff all the time, so this is really fun for me.”

The event costed as little as $20 to reserve a table. In fact, the event is so popular that people even had the chance to already sign up for next year’s Makers Expo.

Already, by the end of the day, the list was full.