In the heart of Dover is an inclusive space for artists of all kinds and for the people seeking live music by underground groups.

Wrong Brain founder and Executive Director Sam Paolini  described Wrong Brain as an art collective and venue with an objective to provide an outlet for “unconventional, underrepresented and emerging artists.”

Wrong Brain Headquarters, located in Suite 459 of the Washington Street Mill in Dover, rents space to artists as well as hosts live music, poetry readings, open markets and various fundraising events like the upcoming Cosmic Prom.

A community space is open to everyone and offers supplies that were donated. Facing the community space on the wall is a rotating gallery where artists can display their work.

A display titled “This is What Trans Feels Like” will go up in January at the gallery. This display is a collaborative effort of art and poetry done by trans people and allies. The gallery will accompany a discussion panel and zine of the same topic.

The community space is also home to music shows that Wrong Brain puts on most weeks, which according to Paolini, normally draw in between 20 and 40 people. Entrance fees are generally $5-10, with most of the money going to the artists who perform.

Jason Rubinstein/ Contributing A view of the stage at Wrong Brain Headquarters in Dover. Recently, the stage hosted DJ Pants and People Skills, providing music for their “Cosmic Prom” fundraiser event.

Jason Rubinstein/ Contributing
A view of the stage at Wrong Brain Headquarters in Dover. Recently, the stage hosted DJ Pants and People Skills, providing music for their “Cosmic Prom” fundraiser event.

Wrong Brain volunteer Andrew Paolini’s favorite thing is “after the show, being able to pay the touring bands” as it gives the groups what they deserve for coming and playing.

Wrong Brain volunteer Pope Jones attended the show last Thursday featuring artists Kyoty, Big Mess, Atsuko Chiba and Glacier. Jones said that the best things about Wrong Brain are the inclusive and safe show space, the magazine (zine) making and the community engagement. Moving to the area without knowing anyone, Jones said, “Just by showing up, I’ve built a community for myself.”

Live music has become a large part of Wrong Brain since it moved to its current space in March, but zines have been at the heart of it all along. Wrong Brain has published nine zines, some of which include audio compilations, and have always distributed them free of charge. These zines are open to anyone who wants to contribute art or writing. According to Sam Paolini, the submissions aren’t judged and anything can be submitted.

Headquarters hosted a first-of-its-kind fundraising event on Saturday, Nov. 5 called Cosmic Prom. This event is a “prom for all the outcasts…in case your prom was terrible, ” according to Sam Paolini.

It was suggested attendees of the prom come in formal wear, space wear or both. There was live music by DJ Pants and People Skills, and refreshments were offered for attendees.

Wrong Brain is a state-registered nonprofit and they hope to be federally recognized as a nonprofit by the end of the year. It’s run by volunteers and funded by grants as well as donations from local businesses such as Dos Amigos, Adelle’s Coffee House and Crackskull’s Coffee. The artists renting the space and the various fundraisers held at Wrong Brain pay for the cost of the room.

A full list of upcoming events and times, as well as more information on how to get involved, can be found online at wrongbrain.net.

Executive Editor