The UNH Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics’ Hospitality Management Program received a national ranking within the top 10 percent of hospitality education programs on Jan. 20.

The faculty of the Hospitality Management department are very proud of this achievement. Former Dean of Paul College and professor Dan Innis stated, “I think that changes within the department within the last year are a large part of this new rating. Work with the Honors program and more…. all of these things have come together within the past year and led to this recognition.”

The program is intense but each student can tailor it to their specific learning desires. For instance, the program has about 23 core courses and electives, from which students can choose. In fact a lot of work goes into the program from both students and faculty.

The faculty and staff of the department put in a lot of work inside and outside of the classroom to improve student learning experiences. This includes faculty research, as UNH professors are required to do some form of research. 

“We achieved that [distinction] for a lot of reasons. The primary is probably that the faculty put a lot of time and effort into their research. I think that demonstrates a dedication to academic work and to helping students,” explained Chair of Hospitality Management Nelson Barber.

According to Innis, this recognition can be attributed to the leadership skills of one man, “the dean of the program, Dr. Nelson Barber is a great leader. By bringing in a great set of faculty, the program has earned this new rating. The department has really done a great job there,” he said.

The Hospitality Management department motto, as found on their home webpage, is that this department is “where experience matters.”

Professor Carl Lindblade explained, “Our departmental recognition lies with our newly enhanced program of industry engagement wherein all our students will have had formal internship experiences as well as 3 years of career development training to provide them the skills needed as they enter the professional workforce.”

According to Barber, “You really have to understand more than the theory, you have to understand how to apply it. We have a partnership with Newmarket International, a hotel-industry software company. Students are practicing the software here in the classrooms. They can put on their resumes ‘I already know how to use hotel-industry software programs’.”

Other hands-on experiences offered by the Hospitality Management program include a capstone project during which students plan, market, host, and run a three day event and a trip to New York City to tour restaurants, hotels, and more. Such hands-on experience and prior knowledge improves chances for career placement after graduation.

These types of training translate extremely well to employment post-graduation. Barber said, “Our placement rate is near 100 percent. We bridge the gap between students and alumni through networking events, seasonal work, and internships.”

Innis had a similar review of the program, adding, “That’s been the case for a very long time. By the time they graduate they’ve really built a solid background: with a mix of hands-on and classroom experience.”

Executive Editor