When the mid-April sun’s rays start to find their way to Durham and the weather finally returns to reasonably habitable temperatures, students jump at the opportunity to get outside. But nearly 1,000 students will be staying inside the Whittemore Center Arena for much of this weekend to participate in the annual Relay for Life event held each April.
So far this year, more than $55,000 has been raised for the event. That number will continue to grow until the event’s conclusion on Sunday at noon—after 24 hours of walking, sharing memories and joining together in the fight to find to find a cure for cancer.
We encourage everyone reading this to participate in the event, even it means only donating a small amount of money or stopping by for fifteen minutes. The sense of community felt while participating will floor you.
This event has been incredibly successful in years past as participation is always impressive, considering that most of these students participating in the event are giving up valuable weekend time. These are the types of headlines that we as students need more of—headlines that lead into stories that illustrate how UNH students are making an impact.
When students join together for a cause that has an impact felt even beyond the reaches of the UNH community, it shows Granite Staters that their largest public university is more than a bunch of kids looking for any chance to party and riot.
We feel that as a campus, we are a vibrant community full of individuals that donate their time outside of the classroom to more noble endeavors than partying. When events like Relay for Life come to Durham, it is imperative that we have a strong showing to help prove just that.
And as the warmer weather begins to arrive, eyes from around the community and beyond have begun to shift to the UNH student body. Headlines from Cinco de Mayo related incidents the last two years still linger, and a certain stigma has been attached to UNH students as a result. The stigma is one that does not accurately reflect the student body as a whole.
It is an unfortunate reality that the actions of a few can put a bad label on everyone else. Overcoming this means that a greater number of students must work diligently to show reclaim the reputation that UNH students deserve.
When potential employers receive resumes from this year’s senior class and beyond, we want them to see a degree from the University of New Hampshire and think positively. Potential employers should have the idea that a candidate for a job from UNH is a community-oriented individual who can add value to a company, not someone who spent the last four years partying.
Relay for Life is just one event that UNH students participate in to benefit charitable and other such community-benefitting programs, but it’s a big one.
Participation this weekend certainly benefits the American Cancer Society’s cause, but also has the potential to benefit your own: when trying to get a job in the fast-approaching future.

Executive Editor