The independent student newspaper of the University of New Hampshire since 1911

The New Hampshire

Something to be proud of


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As you can all probably imagine, I was not the most “normal” child in the world.  My go-to outfit in the sixth grade was knee-high socks, plaid bermuda shorts and a fedora, if that is any indication about what kind of 12-year-old I was.  It wasn’t really a secret that I was different. I mean, anyone with eyes could seek my brace-face smile and lime green plaid shorts from a mile away.  Kids in my class would usually laugh at me and poke fun, but I always smiled and said, “I know, right?! Aren’t these shorts so cool?” and walk away.  

Honestly, I don’t think I really noticed they were making fun of me at all. I was probably too busy with my nose in a book to feel the daggers that came with their words.  But I also know that I truly didn’t care what others thought of me.  I liked those shorts, dang it, and I was going to wear them no matter what.

My parents never told me how to dress (clearly), and always supported me in everything I did, which is why I was so confident in myself and my exceptionally authentic style.  Even though I definitely grew out of my infamous clothes, I was lucky enough to never grow out of my confidence.

On page five, Staff Writer Gates MacPherson wrote a piece about Kappa Delta’s Confidence Week, in which the sorority has been passing out presents to promote confidence outside of Dimond Library all week. I find it wonderful that these women are encouraging others to love themselves, as it is something that is very important in life. I encourage you all to participate in this event and try and find confidence in yourself. But isn’t it sad that we need a confidence week at all? That we can’t find it on our own?  

Unfortunately, in this day in age, confidence is very hard to come by for everybody.  Constant degradation in the media and the pressure to be the ‘right kind of person’ can take a real hit to your self- esteem.  Even I, the plaid-shorts-wearing, overly-egotistical executive editor, have had my fair share of doubtful days.  

It is so easy to compare yourself to the people around you and feel as though your looks, success, personality and other traits are just simply not enough.  The problem with this lifestyle, however, is that we are all focusing on the people around us instead of focusing on ourselves.  

Confidence is not an outward force, it comes from within.  Searching in others  around you for confidence will not get you anywhere, you have to find it in yourself.

So many times I have been told that confidence is a person’s most attractive quality.  There is a certain infectious nature to confidence that bleeds into the people surrounding you.  More often than not, having pride in who you are makes you walk taller, smile brighter and truly be a better you.  

For something that is so necessary in this world, confidence is very seldom found, and I truly think that  is sad.  People deserve to love who they are.  To flaunt what they’ve got and be proud of it, whatever it may be.  There is something to be proud of in every quality, even the ones you may not be too keen on.  

So whether you hate your nose, your squeaky laugh or your terribly awkward apparel, try and love it anyways.  If it is a part of you naturally, then it is something to be proud of.  

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The independent student newspaper of the University of New Hampshire since 1911
Something to be proud of